Street Cred

DEFER artwork on PMCA "Street Cred" title wall.

Alex “DEFER” Kizu has been a busy man.

Within one-week’s time, Kizu has shown in no less than 2 art galleries (Hold-Up Art in Little Tokyo and CREWEST in Downtown LA) and a museum (Pasadena Museum of California Art, for its “Street Cred: Graffiti Art From Concrete To Canvas” show). What’s more, one of his works at the PMCA was used for its title wall! (Unfortunately, we were prohibited from taking any photos after capturing this one.)

DEFER X CREWEST 1

DEFER X CREWEST Opening Night

Opening night for the CREWEST exhibit “NO BITERS ALLOWED” was a smashing success.

One of the few artists with two entries in the show, DEFER’s “LOS ANGELES” print could be seen situated above his other work “Los Angelinos” (below), with both pieces receiving priority placement in the front window next to the left of legendary LA writer CHAZ Bojorquez.

DEFER "Los Angelinos"

DEFER "Los Angelinos". 2011.

 

Lately, DEFER has been in high-demand both, inside and outside, galleries and museums around Los Angeles. He has worked on tribute walls for fellow writers and has been tapped to show work in not just one, but 3 LA gallery shows–all happening within a few weeks of each other: “Hi-Graff” at the Hold Up Art Gallery, “NO BITERS ALLOWED” at CREWEST and “Street Cred: From Concrete To Canvas at the Pasadena Museum Of California Art.

“Los Angelinos” (left), DEFER’s entry for the “NO BITERS ALLOWED” exhibit, is no longer available–it was sold to a New York collector a week prior to the show’s opening–but his “LOS ANGELES” prints are still available. CLICK HERE to get yours!

DEFER X CREWEST 2

DEFER vs Blackbook

DEFER mingled with fans and added some of his signature lettering to their blackbooks.

NBA

CREWEST “No Biter’s Allowed”

Alex DEFER Kizu exhibited work in the CREWEST show “NO BITER’S ALLOWED” on May 7, 2011. This show marks the 9th anniversary of CREWEST and featured the work of West Coast graffiti artists who have been painting since the 1980′s.

Artists:
ACME, AXIS, CHAZ BOJORQUEZ, CRE8, DEFER, ESTRIA, FEAR, HEAVEN, MANDOE, MAN ONE, MEAR, MURAL, NEON, NUKE, PANIC, PJAY, PRECISE, RELIK, RISKY, SACRED194, SINER, SLICK, STREET PHANTOM, TEMPT, VOGUE, VYAL, ZENDER…and the legendary Hector “HEX” Rios.

CREWEST
110 Winston Street (at Main)
Los Angeles, CA 90013
ph 213.627.8272 fx 213.559.0525
info@crewest.com
www.crewest.com

Gallery Hours
Tues-Thur: Noon-7pm
Fri-Sat: Noon-8pm
Sun: Noon-6pm
Closed Monday

History of Graff LRG

The History Of American Graffiti

Interviews from Alex “DEFER” Kizu and examples of his early work are featured in the new book, “The History Of American Graffiti” written by Roger Gastman, co-curator of MOCA‘s “Art In The Streets” exhibit, and Caleb Neelon.

From the publisher:
“Comprehensive, and accessible, Roger Gastman and Caleb Neelon’s The History of American Graffiti offers an unprecedented tour through this vibrant, controversial art form and the grassroots movement that surrounds it. Featuring over 1,000 never-before-published photographs and interviews with hundreds of graffiti artists from New York, Philadelphia, Los Angeles, Baltimore, Cleveland, Phoenix, and beyond, The History of American Graffiti is a raw, real, and revealing look at one of the most unifying institutions of modern city life.”

Graffiti LA, the comprehensive book on street styles and art in Los Angeles features the work of “DEFER” and showcases the work of his crew on the cover!

From the publisher:
Long before graffiti was adopted as the visual expression of hip-hop culture in the 1980s, Chicano gang members in East Los Angeles had been developing stylized calligraphy and writing on walls. Cholo (gangster) scripts became the first distinctive letter forms to evolve in the modern vernacular tradition of graffiti writing. Today Los Angeles writers of diverse backgrounds draw from a unique confluence of cultures that has led to regionally distinctive styles.

Graffiti L.A. provides a comprehensive and visual history of graffiti in Los Angeles, as well as an in-depth examination of the myriad styles and techniques used by writers today. Complementing the main text, interviews with L.A.’s most prolific and infamous writers provide insight into the lives of these fugitive artists. Essential to the understanding of the development of the graffiti movement, this book will be an invaluable source to graffiti fans around the world.